Modern cleaning chemicals go ‘green’

News24 marketing banner

31 May 2013

Hand in hand with an increasing trend towards ‘green’ building and concern for the environment, there is a concerted move towards the use of advanced, new ‘green’ chemicals in regard to products being used in the cleaning industry.

Specifically designed for cleaning floors and hard surfaces, continued use of this advanced, easy-to-use cleaning product prevents future build-up of organic soil and grime, keeping the floor truly deep-clean, odour-free and controlling potentially harmful microorganisms.

This is according to Barrie Steyn, chief operating officer of Sterikleen, a subsidiary company of Excellerate Property Services, who says when ‘green’ chemicals first became available on the market there was a two-week waiting period before they made an impact, i.e. for the bacteria to grow and take effect, but now there is instant impact and continued use further enhances the result.

He says while the entire industry has been moving in this direction for a number of years,  during the last five years there has been a concerted drive among customers and suppliers to utilise ‘green’ products which not only have an immediate impact, but which are also sustainable.

“This increasing demand has resulted in significant innovations, with the use of chemicals which not only work while cleaning is taking place, but also continue to work long after cleaning has stopped. “

Steyn says the latest innovations in cleaning technology have many benefits for businesses, particularly manufacturing and other industrial operations or those where hygiene is critical, such as food production.

As part the KZN-iSimangaliso Coast Care Programme, Sterikleen cleans the beaches for iSimangaliso from St Lucia on the KwaZulu-Natal north coast all the way up to Kosi Bay on the Mozambique border.

He says an advanced formulation with extended microbial cleaning capability provides superior immediate cleaning of surface oils comparable to industrial strength floor cleaners. Using patented microbial technology, the product’s bio-enzymatic action penetrates deep into the pores of the surface to attack and remove embedded residual soils eradicating potential harmful microorganisms, he says.

“From a hygiene perspective, it’s a fact that aerosolised grease and food spills collect particulate soils, contributing to the build-up of grime on kitchen floors. Residual organics collect in the microscopic pores of the surface, cracks, corners and grout and also pack deep into surface irregularities.”

Steyn says floors are not clean as long as these embedded soils remain and detergents alone cannot penetrate the layers of residual grime. As a result, he says, these deposits can produce unpleasant odours and support unwanted insects and bacteria.

Specifically designed for cleaning floors and hard surfaces, continued use of this advanced, easy-to-use cleaning product prevents future build-up of organic soil and grime, keeping the floor truly deep-clean, odour-free and controlling potentially harmful microorganisms. 

It eliminates the greasy floor coating that causes slipperiness as well as the need for rinsing after mopping. In addition, the active ingredient in this stable formulation remains dormant until exposed to organic soil.

Keeping the Coastline Clean

As part the KZN-iSimangaliso Coast Care Programme, Sterikleen cleans the beaches for iSimangaliso from St Lucia on the KwaZulu-Natal north coast all the way up to Kosi Bay on the Mozambique border. 

The iSimangaliso Wetland Park is South Africa’s first world heritage site which includes almost nine percent of South Africa’s coast.  Its beaches include Maphelane Beach, First Rocks, Mission Rocks, Cape Vidal, Leven Point, Sodwana, Nine Mile, Mabibi Beach, Island Rock, Manzengwenya, Lala Nek, Rock Tail Beach, Black Rock, Dog Point, Boteler Point and Bhanga Nek.

“We clean all the beaches during the week and on peak season we clean every day. We use a labour intensive way of cleaning, picking up all the litter and elements that are not natural to the park or beach. The bags of litter are then collected from central points and dropped off at recycling plants such as Wetlands recycling,” says Steyn.

He says they also carry out dune rehabilitation where the dunes have been eroded by storms or animals in the park section. “The advantage of running a labour intensive project is that it creates jobs for the local communities, where there is little or no work available.” 

Email Print Share

Similar Articles

View all articles

Top Articles

View all articles
Top Articles
More property articles...

Newsletter

Get the latest property news in your inbox.
Select your options:

Your browser is out of date!

It looks like you are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer.

If you are using Internet Explorer 8 or higher, please verify that your Internet Explorer compatibility view settings are not enabled.

For the best browsing experience update to the latest Version of Internet Explorer or try out Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.


Please contact our Customer Service Centre for further assistance. Tel. +27 (0)861 111 724